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Jul 19, 2018 Last Updated 2:12 PM, Jul 19, 2018

A question of identity

Implications of the draft Rotuma Bills

OPPOSITION to the draft Rotuma Bills was not to detract the question of unity but it was a matter of identity, explained the adviser to the Council of Rotuma, Dr John Fatiaki in an interview with Islands Business. The Rotuma Bills, respectively the lands act and the Rotuma Act have been a much heated subject in the country, given the friction between the people of Rotuma – who are not in support of the draft legislation, and the government of the day.

Fatiaki says that the definition of Rotuma reduces rotumans to what they used to own - area wise. Hence, areas to do with the governance of the island was one of the major tipping point for Rotumans. “Now we have been under the government of Fiji but the lands act and the rotuma act have been unique,” said Fatiaki.

“The lands is a legislation that govern the island and define transactions in relation to land, it defines the perimeters of the island. And that has been in place for 45 and 89 years respectively,” he said. Quick Background

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Call to end Fiji black list

A FIJIAN opposition party has called for the lifting of travel bans on all individuals – including former Fiji citizens.National Federation Party President, Roko Tupou Draunidalo, said Prime Minister, Frank Bainimarama, needed to follow through his recent rhetoric with action.“Last weekend the PM announced in Australia that any journalist would be free to visit the country and report without restriction once they have been accredited by the Department of Information,” Draunidalo said.

“This also referred to three prominent journalists from New Zealand and Australia who were banned from entering Fiji.”Draunidalo said Bainimarama had urged Fijians in Australia to take advantage of the dual citizenship that Fiji now offers, return home and build houses or start businesses. 

“However all this will remain just tokenism unless bans against those who have served Fiji loyally in their capacity as expatriates as well as former Fiji citizens remain in place.” Draunidalo said the Immigration Department black list that prevented former and current citizens from returning to Fiji, the land of their birth, must be removed.

“The name of academics Professor Brij Lal and his wife, Dr Padma Lal, as well as other individuals who have been placed on this list for frivolous, undemocratic reasons, must be removed if the Prime Minister really wants to show the world that Fiji is a robust democracy.”“Inviting Fijians to return home for simply financial and economic reasons, is not being global at all. They have their families, friends, cultural roots and identity here in Fiji and have the best foundation to contribute to Fiji’s social and economic progress. “

Business as usual?

Pacific challenges for new French President

FRANCE Has a new Presiden after mainstream parties fell by the wayside during last month’s presidential elections. Incoming President Emmanuel Macron saw off a strong challenge by Marine Le Pen of the extreme-Right Front National (FN).  

Macron’s victory means that it will be business as usual in the Pacific, reinforcing the improved relationship between France and Forum member countries. Macron will continue many of the policies towards the region initiated by outgoing Socialist Party president Pacific challenges for new French President By Nic Maclellan Politics François Hollande, on climate change, New Caledonia, support for the European Development Fund and arms sales to Australia.

But with French voters deeply divided over the country’s future, it will be harder for the new President to address complex challenges facing French colonialism in the Pacific. Voters go to the polls again in June for the French National Assembly, and Macron may face a hostile majority in the legislature, even as New Caledonia moves towards a referendum on selfdetermination in late 2018. President Macron will follow Hollande’s policy of making climate change the centrepiece of France’s charm offensive in the Pacific. 

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The middle road

Looking for a Fiji for all

WHEN Tupou Draunidalo chose to leave the Opposition National Federation Party earlier this year, political commentators wondered about the wisdom of such a move. For there are many who believe that without the support of the NFP and its huge support in the cane-growing areas of Fiji, Draunidalo will have little backing ahead of Fiji’s 2018 polls.

But the fiery lawyer and former Parliamentarian has chosen to step away from the Federation to set up a party inclusive of all ethnicities and genders – what she describes as a truly representative political movement. “I believe that the Fijian electorate largely, like many electorates overseas, falls in the middle,” Draunidalo said. “At the last elections, the ruling (FijiFirst) party successfully painted itself as a middle party.

Fiji has seen that that is far from the truth.’’ Fiji’s Prime Minister, Rear-Admiral Frank Bainimarama, drew up a Constitution which included a provision for all people to share the name Fijian – once the exclusive domain of the indigenous population. This single move has been credited with winning many Indo-Fijian votes in the 2014 elections. The Indo-Fijian populations has considered itself second class citizenry due to discriminatory laws in place during colonial times and after the 1987 coup. Now the indigenous people are called iTaukei – ironical because the term means “owner of the land”.

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IT’S just days after New Year and while chaos reigned on the mainland as news spread of an underwater earthquake, the then President of the National Federation Party, parliamentarian Tupou Draunidalo, was sitting unperturbed by the beach.

The threat of a tsunami had passed many hours beforehand, but the little island beach was still deserted - and she was facing an earth shattering decision of her own. Eight months into a full term parliamentary ban that many have called “extreme”, she was contemplating how best to step down so voters didn’t have to miss out on a voice in Parliament. It would be one of the most difficult decisions she’s ever had to make.

“It wasn’t easy,” she said. On reflection, “it was like any divorce, very heart wrenching, emotional and difficult”. One of her mentors, Sydney-based retired lawyer Harish Sharma - who to this day calls her “beti” (daughter) - was once a celebrated leader of the party. Many friends, family members, colleagues and supporters had rallied to her NFP call. But the die was cast. In the weeks leading up to the decision, it was increasingly clear that her firebrand approach was out of step with those who preferred to walk on political eggshells, especially over the accountability of coup makers and other soldiers with coup makers.

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