Mar 20, 2019 Last Updated 7:00 AM, Mar 20, 2019

Will Fiji evolve towards Pakistan’s model of democracy?

  • Oct 20, 2017
  • By  Jone Dakuvula
Pakistan’s military coup in 1999 led to a new form of democracy where the military determined how long an elected government can be tolerated in power. Pakistan’s military coup in 1999 led to a new form of democracy where the military determined how long an elected government can be tolerated in power. Photo: Pakistan Information Ministry.
Published in 2017 October
Read 1238 times
Rate this item
(0 votes)
Tagged under

THE statement in the media by the Chief of Staff of the Fiji Military Forces, Colonel Jone Kalouniwai, in September criticising the speech of National Federation Party MP Parmod Nand, has again raised the question of the role of the army in the political and constitutional system of Fiji. This Essay poses the question whether Fiji, is evolving towards the situation of a “controlled democracy” like in Pakistan under an imposed 2013 Constitution. Does recent history answer this?

This question was first raised by Colonel Kalouniwai’s article July 24, 2017 in the Fiji Sun that provided justification for Section 131 (2) of the Constitution: “It shall be the overall responsibility of the Republic of Military Forces to ensure at all times the security, defence and wellbeing of Fiji and all Fijians”. This provision did not exist in the 1970 and 1997 Constitutions that were passed by our Parliament. There was a similar provision in the decreed Constitution of 1990 but it was repealed under Section 195 of the 1997 Constitution.

It then resurfaced under the decreed 2013 Constitution. The Pakistan situation is where the military and intelligence services are the actual long-term rulers of the country and usually decide how long an elected government can be tolerated in power?

.....to read more buy your personal copy at

 
 

Find Us on Facebook

Cookies make it easier for us to provide you with our services. With the usage of our services you permit us to use cookies.
Ok Decline